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Archive for June, 2018

The Horror of Yulin

Three topics deserve to be highlighted in this month of June.

It was on the 16th June 1824 a small group gathered in a coffee shop in London to form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, later receiving its Royal status thanks to Queen Victoria and becoming the RSPCA.

These were harsh times for many humans, let alone animals, yet those present could see that by advocating reasonable policies real advances could be made in animal welfare. Even then it certainly wasn’t easy with many in authority, including the judiciary, wondering why on earth people were worrying about animal suffering. Richard Martin, one of the founders of the RSPCA, had to fight a court case himself to highlight the fact, even to magistrates, that animal cruelty was now an offence. The policies proposed by the group were seen as reasonable and genuinely improved animal welfare; they changed society for the better.

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton and Richard Martin. Foxhunting founders of the RSPCA.

Undoubtedly, that fledgling movement contributed significantly to the now accepted view that animals should not be made to suffer unduly (though this isn’t to say that everything is perfect in the UK). But around the world there are millions of people whose attitudes towards animals stretch back way beyond even those harsh times in the early 1800s.

The internet has allowed footage of horrendous animal suffering in various countries to be spread by campaigning groups, but addressing this situation is not straightforward. While such abuses are widely condemned, some animal issues can really only be tackled by the peoples and governments of those countries. On the other hand, other abuses are so bad that they cross a line of acceptability and are rightly subjected to outside pressure. Some groups use ‘celebrity power’ to heighten awareness though with differing degrees of success, usually depending upon how that ‘celebrity’ acts. Drawing attention to an issue is one thing, becoming a mouthpiece (and often getting facts wrong) does more harm than good.

Whatever the issue, all campaigns are hampered by limited resources, so one might think that a little prioritising would be a good idea, but clearly not.

Because of a blinkered, often bigoted, obsession with hunting with dogs held by a vocal minority who siezed control of key organisations, including the RSPCA, literally many millions of pounds were, and continue to be, spent on this issue. It’s ironic, therefore, that two of the founding members of the RSPCA, Richard Martin and Thomas Fowell Buxton, were foxhunters, the latter chairing the first meeting. They were also great humanitarians, Fowell Buxton being a key supporter of the movement to abolish slavery. Perhaps ardent antis might like to reflect on that when they are smearing all those who hunt as nasty people.

Before and after the offending image was removed.

Another issue hit the headlines this June, though for more frivolous reasons. Earlier this month, Google has said it will remove a cartoon picture of an egg from salad bowl to avoid upsetting those who now find anything to do with animal farming wrong. Presumably some who have recently been bitten by the vegan bug find the ’emoji’- those little images that can be sent with phone texts and e-mails – so offensive, that they mustn’t be exposed to such an obscene drawing.

Quite why such an image might be ‘upsetting’ is beyond me, but if they really want to see something that is upsetting – in fact something that’s a million light years away from a silly emoji – then look no further than the Yulin dog meat festival currently taking place in China. The summer solstice in June sees the start of this vile ritual and it is truly the stuff of nightmares.

Dogs and cats, many being strays or stolen pets, are literally squeezed into cages with hardly a spare inch to move, they are transported and thrown around as if they were tins of beans, they are held in blistering heat with no food or water and finally dragged to their death, either by being bludgeoned or having their throat slit. And all this can take place on a Chinese street, in front of a cheering, leering crowd. China, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Philippines, Cambodia, North and South Korea all play host to the disgustingly cruel dog meat trade.

Perversely, some people think that the meat will taste better if the animal is stressed, presumably because cortisol is pumped into the blood giving it a particular flavour, so the method of killing may take on an even more horrendous phase; some dogs and cats are boiled alive. The skin and hair have to be removed and skinning the dog alive serves two purposes or, as one particularly shocking video shows, perhaps it’s easier to burn off the dog’s hair with a blowtorch, again while the animal is still conscience.

There will be some people who will say that because many in the West eat cows, pigs, sheep and poultry, there is no real difference to those in the East eating dogs. I don’t accept that excuse for one second.

We have laws against treating any animal in the way China and these other countries somehow think is acceptable. Even if the country has some animal welfare laws these will apply to livestock and often dogs are exempt from such legislation. Furthermore, the dog is part of a unique relationship with humans stretching back over tens of thousands of years, helping us in so many beneficial ways and there are aspects of the dog about which we are still learning. Brutalising and eating dogs is the very worst betrayal of that relationship and is bad enough, but treating them in such a barbaric and cruel way also reduces the tormentors to a primitive kind of human being. Anyone who believes, as some do, that eating dogs ‘wards off evil spirits’ displays their ignorance.

Some will say that this is their culture and tradition, but this deserves not the slightest credence – Yulin is a recently organised festival and in any case no right-thinking person should accept certain activities just because they may belong to a different culture. Those who are so fond of claiming that no one should be ever be offended – some animal rights groups and many on the Left – avoid criticism of other cultures in the fear that it might make them appear to be racists, colonialists or just people with double standards. Yet turning a blind eye to certain atrocities for reasons of ‘multiculturalism’ is a big mistake.

It allows our laws on humane slaughter to be ignored. In the extreme, it leads to marriages arranged between teenage girls and men four times their age; to the grooming of young vulnerable girls by sections of society that have a ‘different’ culture; to children being ‘exorcised’ and tortured because they might be ‘possessed by a demon’; to so-called ‘honour’ killings occur when an action ‘displeases’ the family group. Female genital mutilation is commonplace in numerous countries and despite being illegal in this country, not one successful prosecution has taken place. These aren’t things to accept, let alone celebrate, just to be ‘multicultural’ – they are simply wrong.

The dog meat trade, in all its obscene facets, falls into the same category.

I cannot understand why people who say they care about animal welfare often fail to think through the consequences of their campaigns and can’t get their priorities right. Equally, I cannot understand why the dog charities in this and other countries don’t highlight this vile trade more. Maybe they shy away from criticising so-called traditions of others, maybe it’s because they feel they can do little about it, but the longer they remain silent, the longer this shameful torturing of dogs and cats will continue.

There are signs of change, brought about mainly by the young in these countries who are turning against this hideous practice, but their job will be all the more difficult without wider publicity and condemnation. Boycotts can sometimes work and while virtually everything nowadays is made in China, that country wants trade and cooperation around the world, so raising the issue of the dog meat trade as the mark of an uncivilised country may slowly change attitudes. There are many in China, including academics, who recognise that animal welfare is an important factor in how a country is perceived; the dog meat trade is surely not the face China wants to show to the world.

As far as the smaller dog meat countries are concerned, we can all look for the products they sell here. South Korea is a major manufacturer of mobile phones, televisions and other technology items (Samsung and LG). It also produces well-known car makes (Kia, Hyundai, SsangYong). These companies could so easily put pressure on their government and at the very least should be asked if they find these images of torture from their country acceptable.

It’s too late to stop the Yulin festival this year, but the recent successful prosecution of a dog meat ‘farmer’ in South Korea may set a precedent and signal that the tide is slowly turning.

The torture and suffering of dogs in these countries is a dwindling trade. The more it is highlighted, the more people, especially the young in those countries, will condemn this horror and the harder it will be for the dog meat trade to continue.

More than anything, this obscene trade deserves what it never gives to those unfortunate dogs and cats– the quickest death. That’s a bit more important than worrying about cartoon images of eggs.

http://www.stopyulinforever.org/

http://savekoreandogs.org/

http://koreandogs.org/nami-kim/

 

 

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